November Rising Stars

Each month we take the Rising Stars specimens we created using conventional desktop fonts (with all the control over layout that implies) and see how closely we can replicate those specimens using webfonts, HTML and CSS.

v

Alek

v

Sleeveless

Dressing Down

Bell Bottoms‼

Alek is a casual display script with seemingly effortless connections and a smooth flow. For users of desktop software, its OpenType features offer plenty of potential for creating individually styled and fluid headlines. For web designers, the possibilities are somewhat reduced, but this remains a strong contender for attractive, soft-yet-substantial headlines.


DESIRE

ROTED ROOT VEG.

Beer Baered Hake

Desire is a departure away from the lively fifties-style scripts its designer Charles Borges de Oliveira is known for. It’s really a toolkit for graphic designers to build their own elaborate logos, headlines and title pieces, and doesn’t have much to offer web designers that something like Poster Bodoni Compressed won’t do a little better.


Le Havre Layers

Le Havre Layers

Le Havre Layers

GÂteau

GÂteau

GÂteau

Muffin

Muffin

Muffin

CHEESECAKE

CHEESECAKE

CHEESECAKE

Madeleines

Madeleines

We’ve featured several typeface families recently that employ inventive techniques for layering and stacking: Le Havre is one of the best so far, and also reasonably straightforward to work with. The family is composed of four groups of fonts — shadows, bases/fills, outlines and 3D effects. Combine fonts from two or more of these groups, and use CSS z-index and absolute positioning to create multicolored typography. The only hitch is this technique doesn’t work too well with dynamically created content – so save it for that statically coded announcement on your homepage, or your site masthead if you’re feeling particularly adventurous. For more info on chromatic typography for the web, see our earlier article on the topic.


Ondise

Pooch's

Fireside

Basket

Ondise is one of a burgeoning sub-genre of fonts that simulate hand-and-brush lettering techniques. Like last month’s Asterism, Ondise will bring a loose informality to headlines and titles care of its bouncing baseline and scratchy, quill-pen-like outline.